Almanac for Noise & Politics in Stock now!

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The brand new Almanac for Noise & Politics 2016 (release date May 28, 2016) is made up of a total of five sections that go into depth on some topics previously examined in datacide. Some of the texts have been previously published, some are new and exclusive or translations.

The first section compiles material about and by Nomex, noise artist and film maker, including a discography of his label Adverse.

The second section consists of two critiques of the Left from a communist point of view, one targeting the knee-jerk anti-Imperialism still prevalent in many sections of the Left, the other is an excerpt from a critique of anarchism by Luther Blissett.

The third section is concerned with our ongoing investigations and denouncements of far Right infiltration in popular culture. We see this as an integral part of antifascist activity. Featured here is the article From Subculture to Hegemony – Transversal Strategies of the New Right in Neofolk and Martial Industrial by Christoph Fringeli from datacide eleven.

Part 4 consists of an appraisal of the Vision label which CF ran out of Basel, Switzerland in 1986-1992. The main text is an edited English translation of a contribution to the book Heute und danach by Lurker Grand and André P. Tschan, which appeared in 2012. As it is 30 years ago now that the first Vision appeared it makes sense to document this pre-history of Praxis, which was founded in 1992 after Vision was disbanded.

To illustrate this further and make a connection to the present we reprint Die Menschenhauttrommel (the human skin drum) by Alex Buess from the Vision zine Flash Team Report (Vision 18) from 1988.

The final part of this almanac is a catalogue of our exclusive titles, back issues of datacide and available books.

Emencified Shrill Out: Nomex at the Controls

Interview by John Eden

Nomex should need no introduction to Datacide readers, but here goes anyway. One of the organisers of the seminal “Dead by Dawn” parties held in the mid nineties at Brixton’s 121 Centre, Nomex contributed visuals, abstract/harsh performances and much more besides. His releases on his own Adverse label have included everything from vinyl abuse to the sounds of bones in the Paris catacombs. The Nomex discography also includes output on Praxis, Cavage, and Reverse amongst others. Despite performing across the globe (from Teknivals to art galleries) he is still a purposely-obscure figure to most. What follows is the only print interview I am aware of.

Were you involved with any music/sound projects before Nomex?

That’s not music”

 Yes – many! [Read more →]

DEAD BY DAWN – Explorations Inside The Night

Track *: Resisting the Present
For no apparent reason circulting mists of noise and body music rise up. This is a space-between, a squatted building re-used as a site of becoming. Neither here nor there but re-appearing at angles like groove notations in the run-off of a record. This is an interspace impervious to categories and explanations, not telecommunicatively cleansed with messages and signposts. Here, as track mixes into track miles away from the rave cathedrals, the building becomes an urban socialisation zone where dancers form collages of variable states of mind that connect into collective arrangements. Where there were limits and the gridlock of time and money now rootless packs accelerate into suspension as mouths move into silence. Sensation ripens into experience and experience engenders intensity. An all night party. Shrouded accounts. Inconclusive evidence. A group enunciation that refuses to speak for others and claim the last words when what is sensed can’t be explained. It’s like trying to re-construct a snowstorm.

Track ^ : Each Party is the End of an Era
An all-night party developed and over-inflated: These parties were never intended to be a stepping stone to a commercial venue, they were motivated by a desire to waste, to squander energy for its own sake alone. A collectively activated desiring-machine that was intent on inspiring itself. It was never about seeking abstract and disconnected audiences, instead Dead by Dawn acted as one more event-horizon drawing together malcontents…Making it happen – [Read more →]