Datacide 18 Record Reviews by Christoph Fringeli

No Name
[Rouge de Colere Live 02]
Rouge de Colere Live is a sub-series of the Toolbox sublabel Rouge de Colere which has over many years produced a (small) number of (mostly) interesting cross-over records somewhere between hardtek, hardcore, breakcore and speedcore, some of which have been reviewed in datacide before (most recently the HFK record in datacide seventeen). The live series somewhat runs parallel to the Acid Night Live series (see elsewhere in this issue), but even so this particular release is a special one. Spread over the double vinyl format in a way so the original live set could be re-created by a DJ – the beginning is on side A, the continuation is on side C, then mix in side B, then finish with side D.
No Name of course first drew attention with releases starting in 1996 on labels such as Anticore and Fischkopf. In the article ‘Bonjour Vitesse’ in datacide one the music she and her sister (who usually releases under the name Mouse) make, was described as “some of the most out-there experimental and visionary records ever made in the context of super-fast hardcore”.
Over the more than 20 years the music itself has retained its specific qualities and intensity and this live set spread over four sides is quite a trip, and while not strictly speaking innovative now, is still very unique and the double red vinyl with picture sleeve is a nice collectible item.

The Mover
Selected Classics (Remastered 2017)
[BOIDAE 002]
KillEKill sublabel BOIDAE surprised some heads with a timely Mover retrospective in 2017; timely in so far that the year 2017 always featured as a mysterious reference to a dark phuture emanating from the early catalogue of the Frankfurt based label group Planet Core Productions, also known as PCP.
PCP were versed in the “art of the record label”, setting up a myriad of conceptual sublabels and while there were a few other musicians involved, Marc Trauner, aka The Mover was the one who contributed the vast bulk under a dizzying number of pseudonyms.
PCP was also central to some international hook-ups. Industrial Strength, the label run by Lenny Dee and Jennifer Williams in the early 1990s, even started their catalogue with a double AA-side 12” featuring The Mover and his alias Mescalinum United, and both tracks are featured on the BOIDAE double album.
Furthermore there are two tracks from the very first Mover 12”s Frontal Sickness Volumes each. From 1991 (PCP 005) and 1992 (PCP 008), Nightflight (Nonstop 2 Kaos) and Into Wasteland, and Astral Demons and Invite the Fear respectively. There’s Final Sickness from Frankfrut Trax Vol.4, there’s Waves of Life from the split EP with Alien Christ, also a Mover pseudonym (PCP 934).
Only one of the tracks is from album Final Sickness (The Emperor Takes Place).
The track order of the digital release – which features two extra tracks – is different than the order on vinyl, most notably in so far that the ferocious We Have Arrived is the opening piece of the digital, while it has been relegated to D1 on vinyl.
Also what seems to be a major omission of the vinyl version is that Over Land & Sea from the momentous Signs of ‘96 12” is only on the digital version. The other digital-only track is a second track, Spirit Slasher, from the much later Tresor album (Frontal Frustration, 2002).
It almost goes without saying that you should pick up this compilation unless you already have a few of the original releases, although by the time this issue of datacide hits the street the vinyl may already be deleted.

FFF: Dubcore Volume 12
FFF: The Superpowers
[PRSPCT RVLT 019]/ 24/7 Soundkiller [PRSPCT RVLT024]

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Datacide 18 Record Reviews by Saxenhammer


Diagnostic
Repercussions
[Jezgro JCDAL001]

This is the first release by Diagnostic, the latest project from Jan Robbe (Atomhead/Undacova/Erratic). There are nine original tracks backed up by remixes from KK Null,Katran and Aethereal Arthropod among others. Glitched, industrial tones and clashing noise / ambient flavours are the core of the Diagnostic sound. This is a far out there, harsh, alien soundscape wonderland that very few people are capable of producing to this accomplished level. While there are beats and rhythmic elements at the forefront on a couple of tracks, the finest moments are when the sound is free flowing and evolves with highly nuanced detail through uncharted sonic territories as displayed on “Vantage point” where chaotic electronics become enveloped by deep space ambience into an explosive sonic cocktail. As a long time follower of all of his projects it is nice to hear the progression in this intense and highly individual release.

Savier:
The Fountain of Perpetual Decrepitude [DRKFLT002]

Scottish producer Savier serves up a cassette for London’s Darkfloor Sound label which continues his exploration of bass weight and slow, heavy beats backed up by remixes by a host of Darkfloor artists and associates. The Savier tracks are a mixture between his trademark distorted, metallic drums, glitchy effects and ones with a subtle use of melody which create a distinctive sound most notably on the two shortest tracks “Cast him in” and “Grooming Dead Rats” but also add a creepy flavour to the title track and “Mrs Warboys”. As the tape progresses it becomes more disjointed with each track, having a slightly different flavour while retaining the moody crunch we have come to expect with “Bulk Bogan part 2” sounding particularly unhinged. The remixes here are pretty much an album on their own with seven in total all going off at different tangents. I particularly enjoyed Opine Kosinsky’s noisy hip hop take on “Bulk Bogan“ and Robert Logan’s very psychedelic rework of the title track.


Umwelt / I Hate Models
[ROD 10]

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Datacide 18 Record Reviews by Low Entropy

Current 909:
Something with Black in the Name
[aufnahme + wiedergabe – [a+w XXIII]]
Current 909 is the project of Pure, who should be known by his releases on Praxis, his Loop recordings, or by being one half of Ilsa Gold.
Current 909 already had two outings in the ‘90s on Atmosfear recordings. These blended relentless Techno tactics with bleakest and darkest of atmospheres. And this is where this record continues. We have 4/4 and twisted rhythms and Techno percussions, and something like a perverted Lovecraftian Dark Ambient melange. And this combination works very well. Only 4 tracks, but the food of nightmares.
In a statement, Pure said he is interested in a certain thing, to connect the Techno ecstatics of the ‘90s with the sombre motions of ‘80s Industrial/left-field outings. A very fitting statement for this record, and I think he did succeed.

Patric Catani:
For Pit People (OST)
[Storage Records]
Patric Catani was the leading head case Gabba-Noize berserker in the ‘90s with his output as E-De Cologne, Eradicator and Test Tube Kid. His musical journey took him to other shores eventually too.
The latest permutation of this is the release here: a soundtrack for a video game called “Pit People”. This brings back memories of his mock game full-length album, The Horrible Plans Of Flex Busterman, and includes some of the best tricks and elements of that album.
But to me we find influences of all his anti-career here; the oddness of the Puppetmastaz, the Candie Hank insanity, withered traces of Breakcore rhythms, and maybe, maybe, some remote inspiration of Gabba.
But to give the lowdown, the dominating style is definitely video game music, with catchy melodies, ironic cheesiness, upbeat drumming, bleeps and clonks, and, without a doubt, a big smile during production.
If you like Catani’s music, give it a try. If you liked Flex Busterman – get this immediately!

Umwelt:
Abandon In Place
[New Flesh – NF20] [Read more →]

Earth – Year 2017 – The Mover (1995)

mover

The death of the undercover agent puts the cops into a dilemma since the murder has eliminated a chain of clues necessary to track down a syndicate that specialises in extreme terror. Charlie X is chosen by inspector Rob to take up the mission and goes undercover by posing as a “hot” gun dealer. Charlie X is introduced to Mover, the leader of the syndicate, and is put through various rigorous tests under surveillance, eventually being accepted into the gang. Attempting to break into the target workshop, MOVER and his gang are ambushed by a strong police force. Being unaware of Charlie X’s identity the police shoot him spraying his abdomen and head with a thousand bullets. In the meantime MOVER and his gang successfully blast their way out of COPTRAP filling a few brains with some hot steel. Welcome to wasteland – meet the MOVER!

AU: Is it true you are making a soundtrack for an expensive sci-fi adventure?
M: Maybe! We have to see how it comes out, I’m half way through that project now and if the production crew is happy with the end result they will use it . That’s all I can tell you.

AU: I presume it has been made in the USA?
M: Yes, but don’t haggle any more, otherwise you know too much!

AU: Do you thrive on anonymity?
M: Well you know I’m a machine, I’m wired up I don’t get good feedback of humans, and anyway, stargazing is for fuckers! I’m roaming the earth and it’s nice and doomy here. The sound of MOVER should speak for itself.

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