Fluxus and DIY Concerts

fluxus-and-diy-concert-v2-edit_web
Many different art movements of the twentieth century have influenced experimental music. This essay will focus mostly on the effect the Fluxus movement has had on music. Fluxus was particularly important to the development of an understanding that music does not necessarily have to be harmonic, and most importantly, that anyone can create music by organizing everyday sounds. This essay will discuss the following issues: how Fluxus artists challenged experimental/noise music; how audience becomes part of the performance instead of simply observing; and how noise music (as well as the Fluxus movement in general) was a protest against serious traditional culture.

Fluxus was not the first art movement that started the development of noise aesthetics. The proposal that artists should use everyday sounds in their compositions first appeared in the Italian Futurist painter and composer Luigi Russolo’s manifesto “The Art of Noises”. In his text the author criticized the old fashioned tools for sound production, and as an alternative he proposed making new musical instruments and using a multitude of machines. According to Russolo, perfectly harmonious music had reached a point where it no longer had the power to excite or inspire. Consequently, artists of the Dada movement extended experimental music ideas. A prime example was the Anti-Symphony concert performed in Berlin on April 30, 1919. Later, the Surrealist and Fluxus art movements brought in new, fresh ideas to noise/experimental music. The biggest influences were the Fluxus artists Robert Watts, Wolf Vostell, Nam June Paik, George Maciunas, Philip Corner, Benjamin Patterson, LaMonte Young, and Takehisa Kosugi. Fluxus performances grew out of the principle of concrete (ready-made) sound, and the Experimental Composition classes by John Cage ran between 1957 and 1959 at the New School of Social Research in New York. According to Cage, artists should use actions, concrete sounds, and random things, rather than being represented in an illusionist/harmonic manner. There were two different types of Fluxus performances. The early one was the “Events/Neo-haiku Theater”, which was followed by the “Happenings/Neo-Baroque Theater”. Happenings, environments, and Fluxus made the artist aware of sounds’ potentiality in creating work that retained a sense of immediacy, corporeality, and curiosity. [Read more →]

Datacide Nine second edition out NOW

datacide nine 2014 reprint

Right on time for the Radical Bookfair we re-publish Datacide Nine from 2006! The new edition contains all original texts, but has been thoroughly proof read and newly laid out.

We’re happy to have this long deleted issue back in print; it features some of the most read articles on the datacide web site that are still relevant and of interest today. The original editorial reflects the particular historical situation in which the issue originally appeared: The repression against Teknivals as well as the particular (wider) political situations, while technological developments and economic problems are covered in passing. Out of the ensuing crisis of the already completely marginalized counter culture developed the desire to start something new, and we announced that Datacide Ten would be the last issue. This has of course not been the case. Instead, we felt re-invigorated enough after the 2008 issue of Datacide Ten and the accompanying conference to keep going, and the last few years have seen a consolidation of our release schedule and an expansion in size and content.

Only 100 copies are being printed, of which about 80 will be for sale. There may or may not be further reprints, so best order your copy now! Price is EUR 5.00 including world wide shipping.

If you are a subscriber and would like to have Datacide 9 included in your subscription, please send a mail! The reprint is not automatically sent to subscribers, as they may already have the original edition.

To purchase please send EUR 5.00 via paypal to info ( at ) datacide-magazine.com , or order it through the PRAXIS STORE.

Dope smuggling, LSD manufacture, organised crime & the law in 1960s London

I can’t identify with any certainty the first international drug smuggler my mother – Julia Callan-Thompson – befriended, but one she met early on was Damien Epsilon, an Irishman who’d lived in Ibiza before moving to London in the early 1960s. In 1962 my mother approached Epsilon in Henekey’s pub in Portobello Road. She wanted to go to Spain and had been told he was driving there. Epsilon agreed to take my mother and her boyfriend Geoff Thompson to Ibiza if they shared the petrol costs. After spending a few weeks in Ibiza, Epsilon returned to London and my mother travelled on to Andorra alone. Thompson, who’d proved somewhat erratic about covering petrol costs, went back to London at the same time as Epsilon, but separately. When my mother returned to London, she socialised with Epsilon until he moved back to Ibiza in 1963. She returned to Ibiza many times in the mid-sixties to hang with Epsilon’s set, and this may well have constituted the first of a number of international drug smuggling sets with which she was acquainted. [Read more →]

Mind Invaders (Book Review)

Stewart Home (Ed.): Mind Invaders – A Reader in Psychic Warfare, Cultural Sabotage and Semiotic Terrorism (Serpent’s Tail, London 1997, ISBN 1-85242-560-1)

This anthology edited by Stewart Home collects a selection of material [Read more →]

Conference 2008

Datacide Conference 2008 TIMETABLE

Doors open: 15.00

15.30 – Christoph Fringeli: Introduction to the conference and some thoughts on Hedonism and Revolution
16.15 – Hans-Christian Psaar: Kindertotenlieder for Rave Culture
17.00 – Nemeton: Countervailing Forces: Electronic Music Countercultures and Subcultures
17.30 – Alexis Wolton: Tortugan towerblocks: Pirate signals in the 90s
18.00 – John Eden: Shaking The Foundations: Reggae soundsystems meet ‘Big Ben British values’ downtown
19.00 – BREAK
20.00 – Neil Transpontine: A Loop Da Loop Era: towards an (anti)history of ‘rave’
21.00 – Stewart Home: Hallucination Generation

DISCUSSION

Downstairs:
23.00 – Mario D’Andreta (Alien City Soundscapes)
24.00 – Line Destruction (Spine)
24.45 – Circuit Parallele (Spine, Hekate)
1.30 – The Wirebug (Hekate, Coven H, London)
2.30 – DJ Controlled Weirdness (Unearthly, London)
3.30 – Blackmass Plastics (Dirty Needles, U.K.)
4.30 – Kovert (Criticalnoise.net, Datacide, London)
5.30 – El Gusano Rojo (Hijos de Puta)

[Read more →]