Datacide Sixteen Editorial

A short time after our last issue came out, the British population decided in a referendum to follow the lead of a section of ultra-reactionaries on the right wing of the Conservative Party and UKIP to leave the European Union. In prominent discourse, this development was attributed to some kind of working class revolt. Although there had been a call from sections of the left for a ‘Lexit’ (left exit), this wasn’t essentially an issue of the working class. Rather, it was undoubtedly put into motion by a conflict within the establishment, caused essentially by the fallout of the economic crisis and by their failing strategies to deal with it. Mainstream media – such as the Daily Mail and the Express (both famous for their relentless far right propaganda over the decades, which included support for Hitler in the 30s by the Mail) – managed to whip up xenophobia and managed to mobilise their constituency.

A similar mechanism seemed to be at work when Donald Trump was elected president in the United States. Much of the political class was gobsmacked, but the wanna-be stormtroopers on both sides of the atlantic felt empowered enough to let loose their pent up desire to commit hate crimes. Undoubtedly there is a rise of the far right, but in some ways it could be a golden opportunity for the left, if it is able to organise the resistance against it.

The leaders of the right – from Trump to Putin and Erdogan to Farage – all outwardly suffer extreme narcissistic personality defects and certainly lack any ability to solve even the most basic problems of the economic crisis, except when it comes to pushing aside opposition and profiting politically or even economically from the mess. What is happening isn’t fascism yet, but the tendency towards an authoritarian rule by decree. This is supported by those who used to be known as neo-Nazis, rebranded themselves as the ‘New Right’ in the late 60s, and more recently as the ‘Alt Right’. Many of these are people who hope to draw political capital from this climate. Since the 70s, the ‘New Right’ has been chiseling away at the gains the left had made in that period and has tried to create a discourse-hegemony promoting its racist ‘values’ and pseudo-science. Connected to this is the right’s ongoing fight to control women’s bodies, which makes these authoritarian movements comparable to Islamism, which, ironically, they claim to be fighting.

They are constantly decrying the supposed domination of the media by ‘liberals’, when a platform like Breitbart, which serves as a mouthpiece for the Alt Right, was living off mainstream advertising revenue. This included BMW, Lufthansa, T-Mobile, Visa, Zalando, and even Greenpeace and Oxfam – who all may or may not have known that their ads were featured via Google DoubleClick on the site. Whatever may be the case, the result was that the site appeared legit in a mainstream way.

Countering the apparent momentum of the right, there have been massive mobilisations and popular resistance. But it needs more for the left to come out of its crisis. Much of the traditional left is divided between bickering sects and outdated concepts, and even more so by the focus on identity politics, single issue campaigns, or, worse, the appeasement towards Islamism and other reactionary forces. There is also a widespread inability to see a perspective outside of the narrow perception of what the ‘left’ is. This manifests itself in the return of some left-Keynesian concepts, which are already seen as radical because they move away from the neo-liberal consensus, but they don’t abandon the terrain of capitalism, offering a different way of saving the system instead. A truly radical perspective would have to look beyond a world of commodity production, money and nation states.

One aspect that might well contribute to this weakness may be the fact that the precarisation that most of us are increasingly subjected to manifests itself not only in the conditions of labour, but also by the fact that millions voluntarily donate hours of unpaid work every day to companies like Facebook whose value depends on the participation of as many people as possible. If we add this un-activity to the work day, then little time and energy are left for actual organisation and struggles. We hope with our efforts with this magazine to contribute to meaningful discussions about how to counteract these developments.

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Support Datacide – but how?

Datacide is a radical magazine covering the overlapping areas of countercultural noise & beats and (anti-) politics, critical theory, and post-situationist practice. The things that matter right now.
We have been around for a while. The first issue came out in spring 1997. It didn’t come out very often, but in recent years activities have picked up. In 2015 we published a complete collection of our first 10 issues, a big tome of 364 pages in A4 format and a massive word count, bringing together a unique compendium of the countercultures associated with hard electronic dance music.
This week the fourth printing came back from the printers.

Click on Image to buy to book!

This year we step up the publication of the magazine to twice a year, with 68-76 pages and a colour cover each time. Since 2015 the magazine is amended with the publication of a yearly ‘Almanac for Noise & Politics’ in a pocket book format of 104 pages.
We are also planning several book releases, covering datacide issues in depth.
Luckily printing technology has developed in recent years to a point where it is possible to print small runs for relatively little money, giving a lot of flexibility to small publishers, including those with a radical or subversive agenda.
But digital technology not only made a number of things easier in the production process (such as printing small runs cheaper), it also has changed the ways how people interact with cultural production. This has thrown media outlets from the smallest size to the size of corporations into turmoil and putting many out of business.
Datacide is one of the tiny ones, but even we are not operating on an economically sustainable level. But we firmly believe that what we do is of crucial importance. For this reason we want/need to call on our readers to support these activities:

You can subscribe to datacide by sending EUR 15.00 (or more) to us for a subscription of 3 issues. Please state which issue you want your subscription to start with. You can include back issues in the subscription, issues 11-15 are currently available.

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You can donate money via paypal to info(at)datacide-magazine(dot)com
If you don’t have or don’t like to use paypal, write to the same address and find out about other options.

You can advertise in datacide. If you have anything to sell or to promote, consider putting an ad in the next print edition. Write for our very reasonable rates.
Attention record labels or book publishers: We usually will accept records or books as payment!
Attention zines: we are interested in ad swaps!

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which we can sell!
Got records, books, anything of interest you don’t want anymore?If you think you have something for us, let us know.

We set up an ebay account of which all proceeds go towards making the next issue – and more – happen!

Last but not least get your records, books and coffee from Praxis Records & Books!

Datacide can not exist without the solidarity and support of its readers!

 

Datacide Sixteen release!

DATACIDE SIXTEEN is ready! Order or subscribe NOW to get your copy with the first mailout!

Table of content see below / click on cover image to get to the Order page!
If you prefer to order without creating an account in the Praxis Shop, you can also just paypal 5 euro (single issue)/ 15 euro (subscription for 3 issues) to info@datacide-magazine.com – However when ordering through the shop you will receive a voucher for a 10% discount for your next order.

In order to be able to offer the super-cheap price of only 5 euro INCL. world wide shipping we need to be able to do bulk shipments. The first lot will leave datacide HQ in Berlin Thursday March 16 at 2pm. If you order before 1pm your copy will be included.

Even better than just ordering a copy of the new issue, please consider taking out a SUBSCRIPTION for only 15 euro for three issues incl. shipping. [this will also protect you against a future rise of the cover price – which is quite likely]

BERLINERS are welcome to join us this friday, March 17, 2017, at Vetomat, Wühlischstr. 42, for a small launch event with a presentation of the new issue and a public discussion with datacide contributors Christoph Fringeli, Alexia Elliott and others t.b.c. Meet for some drinks, küfa, and noise!

 

Everything Else is Even More Ridiculous – Introduction by Christoph Fringeli

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What strikes me when I look back at the first issue of datacide is that there is no editorial, no statement of intent — something remarkable for a new marginal publication launching itself.

Instead, the zine jumps right in with a reprinted update on the then proposed new police bill. This is followed by news items about a record company trying to copyright the term ‘Teknival’. We perceived these events as a two-pronged assault by the state and by commerce on what we saw as an emerging underground movement connected to hard electronic dance music. Indeed the following news about ‘new networks of distribution and communication’ were trying to counteract this with the optimistic proposal of a mode of autonomous organisation that would function in an ‘entirely decentralized manner that allows the specific identity of its “members” maximum freedom, a rhizome-like structure that is invisible and everywhere at the same time’. This is then illustrated with news about current activities of record labels and soundsystem crews, reviews of parties and interspersed with some experimental fiction pieces. The mixture of artist interviews, record reviews, technology critique, counter-cultural angles as well as programmatic texts set the tone for the following issues. In datacide one it was left to the London Psychogeographical Association to make an explicit call for communism, while it was Flint Michigan who provided a programmatic text titled BREAK/FLOW versus DATACIDE.

Due to the political climate at the time the first issue went to print, datacide didn’t need explanations or an explicit statement of intent to be understood by its audience. [Read more →]

Datacide 15 Editorial

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‘Everyone has the right to seek and to enjoy in other countries asylum from persecution.’
Article 14.1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

It seems fair enough to deduce from this formulation that the denial of this right to freedom from persecution would constitute a human rights violation. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights formulates some essentials of Western democratic self-understanding. It is not surprising that a country like Saudi Arabia refused to sign it in 1948, stating that the Declaration contravenes Sharia Law. Certainly the right wing populist mass movements led by Marine Le Pen, Donald Trump, HC Strache or Frauke Petry are not defenders of Sharia Law, but in many ways these movements are the other side of the same coin of the ultra-reactionary movements in the Middle East.

These movements in the West go beyond lobbying their own governments to suspend human rights to keep out those who are trying to flee the carnage caused, in many cases, by Islamic fundamentalists. In the US, Trump has been vocal in advocating even worse torture than is already being used by the current administration as well as the killing of whole families. In Germany, politicians from the Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) have stated that ‘if necessary’ refugees, including children, should be prevented from entering the country with lethal force. Despite this, Trump is currently the frontrunner of the Republican candidates in the US presidential race, and the AfD enjoys ratings and election success in Germany outdoing any party to the right of the Christian Democrats since the beginning of the Federal Republic.
We’re witnessing a dramatic brutalisation – at least in the rhetoric – of Western politics. [Read more →]

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