Everything Else is Even More RIdiculous – Datacide 1-10

Everything Else is Even More Ridiculous – Introduction by Christoph Fringeli

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What strikes me when I look back at the first issue of datacide is that there is no editorial, no statement of intent — something remarkable for a new marginal publication launching itself.

Instead, the zine jumps right in with a reprinted update on the then proposed new police bill. This is followed by news items about a record company trying to copyright the term ‘Teknival’. We perceived these events as a two-pronged assault by the state and by commerce on what we saw as an emerging underground movement connected to hard electronic dance music. Indeed the following news about ‘new networks of distribution and communication’ were trying to counteract this with the optimistic proposal of a mode of autonomous organisation that would function in an ‘entirely decentralized manner that allows the specific identity of its “members” maximum freedom, a rhizome-like structure that is invisible and everywhere at the same time’. This is then illustrated with news about current activities of record labels and soundsystem crews, reviews of parties and interspersed with some experimental fiction pieces. The mixture of artist interviews, record reviews, technology critique, counter-cultural angles as well as programmatic texts set the tone for the following issues. In datacide one it was left to the London Psychogeographical Association to make an explicit call for communism, while it was Flint Michigan who provided a programmatic text titled BREAK/FLOW versus DATACIDE.

Due to the political climate at the time the first issue went to print, datacide didn’t need explanations or an explicit statement of intent to be understood by its audience. [Read more →]

Everything Else is Even More Ridiculous – Introduction by Nemeton

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Written soon after the publication of the first and second issues of datacide, Praxis newsletter #12 (1997) states, “With the increased availability of technology that makes it easier than ever to create, produce and distribute independent material, new networks and mechanisms have started to operate in the last decade. We called it techno. But even the phuturistic rigidity of techno was not immune against the counter-strategies of the system. We need new strategies of underground resistance, the beats have to be broken the noises twisted, desires reinvented, the phuture manifesting itself in the present, breaking the rules of the past.” [1] This oppositional call for resistance is one of the myriad collective strategies that inform Praxis, the record label, and datacide, the magazine for noise and politics. Many comrades-in-arms, a million jackals, have explored in theory and practice the potentialities and failures of countercultural, resistant and oppositional currents in hard electronic dance music, culture and politics. What is at stake in making a claim for the possibilities of co-creating transnational countercultures, and is that even realizable in the current economic and political conditions?

Counterculture and subculture as conceptual and historical tools have been defined in often competing and contradictory ways, especially concerning the subversive, resistant and revolutionary potentials, leading to a lot of confusion and uncritical use of the terms in various electronic music scenes. [Read more →]

Everything Else is Even More Ridiculous – Introduction by Dan Hekate

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Is this an introduction or a tangent into the befuddled mind of a fantasy writer? I guess I’ll leave that for you to decide, I mean if you’re willing to delve into the dark recesses of the many warped, angry, deep thinkers and music makers (not always mutually exclusive) who have delivered the contents of this Datacide collection, then you should at least be able to think for yourself. Yes you’re right this is not a paper version of ‘OMG nothing could have prepared you for…’ mindless click bait or some Youtube video you can zone out to, this isn’t a coffee-table whatnot or something to flick through when you’re tired of the old issue of Viz your mate left in your bog. Engage or jog on.

And so to begin. The first I heard of the book I was sitting in Datacide HQ, the cold winds blew their glacial breath over the frozen north and inside it wasn’t much warmer. We sat huddled in our jackets and no, dear reader, we were not wearing balaclavas, there were no Kalashnikovs on show and the heterogeneous theory for the invisible insurrection of a million minds was accompanied by tea and biscuits. [Read more →]