Interviews

Interview with Mark Newlands / Bloody Fist

bloody-fist

datacide: Bloody Fist is in a way one of the most influential labels in the hardcore scene – how do you see your position there and what’s your background?
bloody fist: Background is basically what I grew up listening to, hip hop, electro, other strange electronic music, industrial music, all that sort of thing, I kind of have a sympathy for the avant garde I suppose. What comes out on Fist is a collation of everything that I listened to when I was growing up, all thrown into one big melting pot, and I think that at least the stuff that I write is that that I just described, and the other music that comes out that we release from the other guys who write music down there is a similar sort of thing, it’s a collation of what they were listening to as they were growing up, getting into music , all sorts of things like that, beginning to experiment with machinery. That’s the explanation for what we release.
As for our position in the hardcore scene, I don’t know, and I’m not really that interested in keeping a check on that; we do what we do, and if that means we’re stuck off in a corner away from everyone else, then fine. If people are into it, if they think it’s good and it’s a worthwhile label then even better, but it’s not something we consciously work towards. If we put a record out and it doesn’t sell, then fuck it. We put it out and if we’re pleased with the product then this is fine. [Read more →]

virtual worlds & concrete STRATEGIES

The internet server and web-site t0 and Public Netbase, an open access point that combines many threads of subversive uses of technology are located in the heart of Vienna, also hosting a weekly evening with talks and experimental electronic music called e-scape. Konrad Becker, techno-activist for a decade and a half, is the brain and pulse behind this, along with a dedicated crew of cyber-guerrilleros. I spoke to him in February ‘97 when I played at e-scape. [Read more →]

Legal Defense and Monitoring Group Interview (1997)

LDMG: The function of the Legal Defense and Monitoring Group is to provide protection for demonstrators from police harassment. It came out of the Trafalgar Square Defendant’s Campaign and Poll Tax Prisoners Support Groupings who got together after the Poll Tax Riots and the idea came up of defending crowds against the cops fitting people up. [Read more →]

Test Tube Kid Interview

Starting with E-de-Cologne’s Live at the Sex Shop Patric C. has released a steady and prolific output of tracks on the hard fast & noisy end of the spectrum, most recently as Ec8or and Test Tube Kid.
Interview conducted in July 1995

ttk

TTK: Whatever you want to ask, but maybe a bit about things in general.
datacide: Let’s start with your work – the earliest things I know are the records on Monotone. They were already quite speedcore, but also experimental – were those your first records, and how did you conceive this sound?
TTK: Yes, my first record was LIVE AT THE SEX SHOP on Monotone, Monotone 19 I think it was, and if you look at Hardcore, that was at the beginning… The first record I bought was PCP: T-Bone “Fucking” Castro He’s Ruff, He’s Rugged, He’s Full of Shit, and at the time I thought Hardcore would go into a direction of getting noisier and noisier, so it would move away from the usual ideas of Techno that are dominated by grooves etc, not progressing from grooves, but intensifying certain things and including a certain attitude. [Read more →]

Objection to Procedure Interview with Christoph Fringeli (2000)

Objection to Procedure Interview with Christoph Fringeli (2000)

1. Your contribution to the harsher elements of hardcore are most easily
chronicled in the progress and history of the Praxis label. Please describe
what you saw Praxis’ purpose when it began in 1992, and what you see its
purpose as now.

I had been involved with what you might call industrialnoisejazzpunknowave shit in the mid- to late 80’s, and ran a label called Vision in Basel, Switzerland, where I grew up. Around 1990 I became extremely disillusioned with the “independent” scene, as it seemed to be replicating the mechanisms and values of the major music market. This is a process that hasn’t stopped since: it’s all about commodification of young people’s creative energies, and channeling them into something that is cementing the current dominant social-relations by creating the idiotic concept of “great artists” = “stars”, and divisions between audience and performers.
When the first wave of Acid House hit (say ’87) I was quite intrigued by the DIY aesthetic and the concept of anonymous white labels, but with the exception of a small handful of tracks, such as Phuture’s Trax releases which I thought were brilliant, really fucking weird, overall there were not that many interesting tracks to support a whole new concept of use value of records, which I think really happened around ’90/91. Suddenly there were all these 12″s coming out that had a much harder sound, and I think for me personally seeing Underground Resistance in the Tresor club in Berlin was a real turning point, but it was backed up and supported by countless often anonymous producers churning out banging tracks all over the world.
By the end of 1991 I was squatting in South London and the following year the first couple of Praxis records appeared. I’d rather not try and “chronicle” Praxis here, as it had and continues to have an intense history, but to try and stay clear and short, one of the basic departure points were that I wanted to take elements of the new dance culture and push them a bit further, distort them, make them more extreme.
I was, and I’m still, particularly interested in the aspect of collective cultural creation and experience. The “artist” would no longer so much express their personal feelings towards the world and expecting to be admired for it like in rock music, but take elements others were working on and add their touch, throw it back into a collective pool; and the actual experience of the music would not so much take place in the bedroom, but at a party where a DJ would use records as raw material for his set.
Of course the existing system of record labels, distributors and media has done everything to appropriate these tendencies and recuperate them for their economy; of course the revolution has not been successful in the sense that the old concepts have been destroyed, with a lot of help by the media they survived in people’s heads. Of course there were soon DJ stars etc, but at the same time there exists a resistance network that simply produces the better, more exciting music, and it’s self-organized, autonomous and based around sound systems and small labels.
Praxis exists in this context of feedback loops between producers, sound systems, underground distribution, always trying to add a new twist to the dialectics of liberation.
[Read more →]

Pages: Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next