Entries from December 2014

Datacide 14 Record Reviews by Nemeton

Ontal: Combat Engineering (Overdraw 01)
The newest release from the Serbian duo of Boris Noiz and Darko Dekode is completely storming and definitely matches our hopes since following Ontal’s music and mixes with great interest for some time. It is great to hear this on vinyl. A1 Combat Engineering is a searing, ruthless, grinding track with hard-hitting beats and industrial noise; A2 is a remix by Tomohiko Sagae, whose mixes are superb. B1 Lithosphere is a gritty, pounding abstract tune, and B2 ends it hard with Taphonomy. Definitely recommended!

Eschaton: (Token 38)
This is the first release that brings together Ancient Methods and Orphx. The tracks have been kicking around online in mixes and such for quite some time, so it was great to see the vinyl release finally come out in January 2014. Eschaton played live for the first time at Berghain in mid September 2014. We are huge fans of Ancient Method’s grinding, industrial techno, and we were greatly impacted by Orphx’s early releases on Hands like Vita Mediativa and Fragmentation on Malignant, but are less interested by Orphx’s more straight style of techno production of the last years. A1 Age of Iron is a solid techno track with a nice groove and full-blown bass; A2 Degenerate is a more subdued sound, with a slower and slightly off kilter tempo. B2 Seven Signs is the most abstract with expansive reverb, interesting clips, clinks, and other metallic sounds, which lead up to the dance oriented crescendo. This release has a lot of [Read more →]

Datacide 14 Record Reviews by Christoph Fringeli

No-Tek: Neurotrope 029 (NRT029)
Neurotrope has been churning out a fair number of releases and is celebrating its 10th birthday this year. Compared to most other French labels with roots in the tek scene, their output is more varied with releases touching on industrial techno and breakcore as well as hardtek and hardcore. Number NRT029 collects four tracks under the No-Tek monicker, this time this means two by Minimal Dancer remixed by La Foudre, and two by La Foudre himself. Here he goes way back to the feeling of the early No-Tek material, and you would be forgiven if you feel like you’re time travelling to a teknival in the mid-90s where bare kick drums and sparse noises fill the air shortly before sunrise. The final track The Rhythm of the World is slightly more up-tempo and melodic. Overall this is a less experimental or harsh release than some of the La Foudre material on No-Tek’s own label.

Parasonic:
The Invisible ZMK EP
(Rouge de Colere 10)

Rouge de Colere has been Toolbox’s more hardcore oriented label since the early days when they set up their distribution in Paris around 1998. Early releases were by Sammy, Speedy Q’s, Fast Forward, Heretik – and a white label only 12” by Radium which never made it to the trademark red vinyl general release. In 2002, a record by BudBurnerz was the high point for the label, but then it ceased production for a decade, and it wasn’t until 2012 when it made a comeback in conjunction with Toolbox picking up pressing more releases again including their other labels (Peur Bleue, P’tit Gris, Toolbox Killerz, and more recently Acid Night). Since the hiatus, [Read more →]

Datacide 14 Record Reviews by Kovert

Dead Fader – Scorched – (Small but hard 03)
Scorched was released at the same time as ‘Blood Forest’ on Robot Elephant.
While ‘Blood Forest’ was presumably intended to showcase DF’s tender side, bringing back some bad memories for this reviewer of accidentally listening to some dodgy IDM tunes, ‘Scorched’ is a mostly nice heavy set. Creeeep‘s the big cut here. It first caught my ear as one of the stand out cuts on the excellent 3by3 label mix a couple of years back. A 140ish miltant smasher with a grinding b-line and snappy snares. Also worth checking are the beatless pieces like Danger zone which have an eerie Tarkovsky feel.

Dead Fader – In cover – (Robot Elephant 18)
Curious development: a vinyl release with three reasonably dull cuts in a meldodic IDMish vein that’s worth finding for the two distorted ear bleeders that are included as a ‘bonus’ download. Mandel and Ceaser were apparently leftovers from the ‘Scorched session’, and are two massive overdriven off-cuts. Would’ve made a heavy 7″: Ceasar getting the balance between tension and release exactly right, with an expectant, offbeat intro that cuts to nothing before smashing back in with an overdriven half-step rhythm, that’s too short, but begs the rewind; and Mandel slowly modulating disconcerting vibes under crunchy distorted breakstep drums, that weirdly ends with a minute long fade-out.

Cut-Up-Marx Ten


Tearing down
of all this

Well-defined bounds

Existing needs

The deification of
national boundaries
as the object
of consumption

Subdue it
of its power
for the first time
this cycle
elevated
intellectual escape
self-justifying nothing

(p.99)

Uganda: Anti-Homosexuality Bill update

Within a few months of the last Datacide going to press, the Anti-Homosexuality (AH) Bill was passed into law by the Ugandan government. In that issue, the article Confessions of an Accidental Activist cited a senior government insider suggesting that the Ugandan President, Yoweri Museveni, was using the bill as a bargaining chip in negotiations with the ‘international community’ (i.e. Western donor nations). He could use his control over the AH Bill as part of international negotiations on economic and geopolitical issues, such as control of oil revenues, regional conflict and the security of his tenure. At the same time, expressing support for the Bill domestically would help secure fundamentalist-religious voting blocs ahead of the 2016 elections, which will mark 30 years of rule by Museveni’s National Resistance Movement. The president will thereby be seen to be standing on a platform of ‘traditional African values’ opposed to the decadent, domineering Western imperialists who are forcing homosexuality on Africans under the guise of human rights. The rabid homophobia rhetorically subsumed under these ‘African values’ is, ironically, an import from the US evangelist movement, whose influence on the population of Uganda is perhaps as significant as that of the Western donors.

Here was a skilful post-colonial balancing act for the president: appearing internationally as the guardian of order over an intolerant and fractious society, while pandering domestically to the most cynical demagogues of that same society. So, many were surprised that Museveni had finally tipped the balance and allowed the Bill to pass into law. How had the president achieved this without alienating the liberal donors? [Read more →]

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