Alexander Reid Ross: Against the Fascist Creep (Book Review)

Alexander Reid Ross
Against the Fascist Creep
AK Press, Chico, Oakland, Edinburgh, Baltimore, 2017
ISBN 978-1-84935-244-4

In the introduction, Alexander Reid Ross, who is a lecturer in geography at Portland State, explains what he means by ‘fascist creep’: it ‘refers to the porous borders between fascism and the radical right, through which fascism is able to “creep” into mainstream discourse. However, the “fascist creep” is also a double-edged term, because it refers more specifically to the crossover space between right and left that engenders fascism in the first place’.

Summing up different theories about fascism, he concludes: ‘fascism is a syncretic form of ultranationalist ideology developed through patriarchal mythopoesis, which seeks the destruction of the modern world and the spiritual alingenesis (“rebirth”) of an organic community led by natural elites through the fusion of technological advancement and cultural tradition’.

In the 390-page book he sets out to document this ‘creep’ from its beginnings to its current manifestations, from classical fascism to third positionism, national bolshevism, and autonomous nationalism. He also makes meaningful distinctions between the ‘radical right’, fringe ‘conservatives’, and neo-fascists or neo-Nazis without obscuring their many overlaps.

One of the difficult things to grasp about fascism is its fundamentally contradictory nature if one is looking at it in terms of a coherent program, philosophy, or ideology. This is something that has not been denied but rather celebrated by different fascist spokesmen, from Benito Mussolini to Armin Mohler, who emphasised that fascism rather than being bothered about its discrepancies in theory was more concerned with ‘style’. [Read more →]

Emperor Palpatine

Here are the fundamentals: they are the same everywhere. The slave is always conscious of his slavery, and often makes desperate efforts to mitigate it. Sometimes he seeks that mitigation in outside activities that promise to give him the sense of dignity and importance that his daily labour denies him. Sometimes he tries to give a false appearance of dignity to the work itself. More often than not he blames the wrong person.

After World War II, Great Britain was completely and utterly broken. London was a large bomb site, and many of its old buildings were destroyed only to be replaced by awful tower blocks. Rationing existed until the 1950s. The empire was gone. Hence, fear might restrain the skeptic. The press then offered its readers an all-embracing refuge of security and consolation without which for many their lot would have been unendurable. But it is only a matter of time until this refuge is changed into something different. Take the story of Cecil King as a case study.

cecil king [Read more →]

Datacide Talk this Saturday May 12th at OKK, Berlin

Praxis and Datacide support the OKK and their Critical Reflections of Berlin Biennale 7 titled “2012 is the Season for Treason”. Taking place at Raum 29, Prinzenallee 29, Berlin-Wedding. Free entry.
Watch out for Datacide talk this saturday based on the article “From Subculture to Hegemony: Transversal Strategies of the New Right in Neofolk and Industrial”. More infos on the rest of the program:
http://www.kritische-kunst.org/
and here:
http://2012istheseasonfortreason.wordpress.com/