Brazilian Scene.

This small report tries to show past and present of brazilian hardcore/breakcore. I have to say that I (retrigger) am gonna tell it from my point of view and this is a subjective text, based on my experiences, that’s one of the reasons that this is gonna be written in first person. It’s also gonna be written around TEMP crew history, as I don’t know anyone else doing parties or anything else like it over here. Of course, i am not making this up, so trust me, and let’s cut the crap and start.
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TEK IT UP

This is a report from the frontlines of this year’s Czech teknival, held the first weekend of August. It is an updated and elongated version of an article that first appeared the week after teknival in ‘Scandaloso’, a free party zine produced in English and translated into as many languages as possible where applicable.
To get copies etc, contact: scandaloso24@yahoo.co.uk
The vibrancy of the culture and the beauty of the country have had party-heads coming to CzechTek since 1994. The culture and music festival has grown from small beginnings; two years ago at the largest CzechTek so far there were around 30-40,000 participants including dozens of sound systems.
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Teknival – Summer Thunder

summer-thunder

A Paris based record shop & distribution company called Techno Import have ‘officially’ registered the name Teknival as their own using the cover name of Cyborg Productions. This shameless act of plagiarism follows a mysterious CD deal with Network 23 (another french based company formerly dealing with their own label and other small independents). The highly controversial CD has been heavily advertised on TV as Spiral Tribe – The Sound of Teknival. They initially also the registered the name Spiral Tribe but relinquished it after a short and intense battle [Read more →]

Objection to Procedure Interview with Christoph Fringeli (2000)

Objection to Procedure Interview with Christoph Fringeli (2000)

1. Your contribution to the harsher elements of hardcore are most easily
chronicled in the progress and history of the Praxis label. Please describe
what you saw Praxis’ purpose when it began in 1992, and what you see its
purpose as now.

I had been involved with what you might call industrialnoisejazzpunknowave shit in the mid- to late 80’s, and ran a label called Vision in Basel, Switzerland, where I grew up. Around 1990 I became extremely disillusioned with the “independent” scene, as it seemed to be replicating the mechanisms and values of the major music market. This is a process that hasn’t stopped since: it’s all about commodification of young people’s creative energies, and channeling them into something that is cementing the current dominant social-relations by creating the idiotic concept of “great artists” = “stars”, and divisions between audience and performers.
When the first wave of Acid House hit (say ’87) I was quite intrigued by the DIY aesthetic and the concept of anonymous white labels, but with the exception of a small handful of tracks, such as Phuture’s Trax releases which I thought were brilliant, really fucking weird, overall there were not that many interesting tracks to support a whole new concept of use value of records, which I think really happened around ’90/91. Suddenly there were all these 12″s coming out that had a much harder sound, and I think for me personally seeing Underground Resistance in the Tresor club in Berlin was a real turning point, but it was backed up and supported by countless often anonymous producers churning out banging tracks all over the world.
By the end of 1991 I was squatting in South London and the following year the first couple of Praxis records appeared. I’d rather not try and “chronicle” Praxis here, as it had and continues to have an intense history, but to try and stay clear and short, one of the basic departure points were that I wanted to take elements of the new dance culture and push them a bit further, distort them, make them more extreme.
I was, and I’m still, particularly interested in the aspect of collective cultural creation and experience. The “artist” would no longer so much express their personal feelings towards the world and expecting to be admired for it like in rock music, but take elements others were working on and add their touch, throw it back into a collective pool; and the actual experience of the music would not so much take place in the bedroom, but at a party where a DJ would use records as raw material for his set.
Of course the existing system of record labels, distributors and media has done everything to appropriate these tendencies and recuperate them for their economy; of course the revolution has not been successful in the sense that the old concepts have been destroyed, with a lot of help by the media they survived in people’s heads. Of course there were soon DJ stars etc, but at the same time there exists a resistance network that simply produces the better, more exciting music, and it’s self-organized, autonomous and based around sound systems and small labels.
Praxis exists in this context of feedback loops between producers, sound systems, underground distribution, always trying to add a new twist to the dialectics of liberation.
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Praxis Interview by Joel Amaretto – Frontpage 95-01

Praxis Records Interview conducted by Joel Amaretto, published in German Techno monthly Frontpage in January 1995

frontpage4-05095

Wir schreiben das Jahr 1995, und die Karten werden neu gemischt. Neue Szenen bilden sich und neue Innovationen bahnen sich langsam aber sicher ihren Weg. Im vergangenen halben Jahr entstand in Europa ein neuer Underground, der im Hardcore nicht nur einen aggressiven Gegenpol zu Trance, Hardtrance, House und Langweiler-Acid sieht, sondern auch eine politische Ausdrucksform. Die Protagonisten dieser Bewegung verstecken sich in den Vororten von Paris (Gangster Toons Industry, Explore Toi), Berlin (Digital Hardcore Recordings, Capital Noise), Hamburg (Cross Fade Enter Tainment), Frankfurt (PCP, Kotzaak), Kaiserslautern (Napalm) und vor allem mit Praxis Records im Londoner Stadtteil Brixton, wo mit Christoph Fringeli der ideologische Übervater dieser jungen und Außenstehenden schwer zugänglichen Szene sitzt. Joel Amaretto sprach mit dem gebürtigen Schweizer über die nächste bevorstehende Revolution.

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