Elements Toward TechNET Track 3

TechNET was, as the review in the same issue of Alien Underground (self-ironically) stated,
“Some kind of glorified techno flyer passing itself off as a bulletin of the digital underground, argueing for techno as the locus of a new counter culture. Has too much bass gone to their heads? or are these pretentious scribblings encouragement for a tentative optimism, flight lines guiding us to a politics of desire, slippery messages concerning beautiful thought patterns possessed of the art of disappearance, theories of identity that liberate the soul in the dance of all possibilities.” We’re hoping to add other texts some time in the future, here are Elements Toward TechNET Track 3 [Read more →]

Interview with Christoph Fringeli by klav (2004)

Interview with Christoph Fringeli by klav
Published in french in SOMA magazine in 2004

Here’s the unedited english language interview
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AUDIO-PHILOSOPHICAL DWELLINGS

With the expression “Audio-Philosophical Dwellings” you refer to every symbolic support of Sonic Belligerency, whatever its nature and importance. For example: a turntable with modified pitch, a record covered with bits of sellotape to indicate concrete sounds to be scratched, a particularly creative gunk and, more generally, every site in which Extraordinary Sonic Happenings (E.S.H.) favor the suspension of dominant behaviour codes. You can distinguish “permanent” audio-philosophical dwellings in which the E.S.H. is endless, and “temporary” audio-philosophical dwellings in which the E.S.H. strikes and runs away.
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Teknival and the emancipatory potential of technology

This text is based on a talk given at the One-shot Art Festival in Berlin, October 2007 as part of an evening organised by Datacide that explored the theme: noise, politics, autonomy and recuperation.

The purpose of this text is to historify the Teknival/Free-Party scene as belonging to a history which views technology as having emancipatory potential. This history extends back to the 1930s when Walter Benjamin along with Bertolt Brecht produced a penetrating analysis of the potential offered by, the then emerging, technics to provide the tools to change the conditions of cultural production and eventually offer a renewed social configuration. Their legacy has been developed beyond the Teknival scene in various directions and is currently being discussed in Open Source Culture with some parallels to Teknival. There are different layers to this history and it is clear that the Teknival scene did not by any means offer the most advanced analysis of the emancipatory potential offered by technology. Looking at the theories of technology that have emerged, both positive and negative, and placing Teknival among such histories we are able to see some of its shortcomings and begin to discuss future strategies. As in the 90s Capital is consistently recuperating any ruptures that appear to open enough space to begin to redefine the social and technical landscape. Unlike Heidegger’s pathetic suggestion that only a God can save us now, it seems much more likely that a critical theory of technology is going to be of more use if we are to agree that ‘what human beings are and will become is decided in the shape of our tools’ (Feenberg: 2002:3).
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Commodities for the Jilted Generation

Thoughts on the presentation of rebellion in the artwork of (Post-)Rave records.

Abstract
On the basis of two drawings I´m going to show the conception of rebellion in record artworks from 1994 and 2003. Based on that I draw conclusions about political ideas as a criticism of ideology. The drawings were part of the artwork of the album „Music for the Jilted Generation“ by The Prodigy and „Kill Sound Before Sound Kills You“ by Kid606. Because the latter is a caricature of the first one it´s possible to spot the commonalities and differences.
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