London Psychogeographical Association: Belief Is The Enemy

From Alien Underground 0.0, London 1994
by LPA

lpalogo

A thread runs through the recent constitutional debate initiated by Prince Charles — the thread of faith. By proposing himself as the Defender of Faith, the wanna-be king hopes to resolve the prospect of being debarred from the throne for being married to a Roman Catholic. Princess Diana has held back from declaring her allegiance to Rome, although it is public knowledge that she is ‘under instruction’ — a technical term describing a brain-washing technique that would-be converts to Rome are obliged to undergo.
Diana’s restraint has forced Charles to fight against the constitutional restrictions against Roman Catholics — under threat of losing the throne. [Read more →]

Critical Art Ensemble: The Electronic Disturbance (Autonomedia, 1994)

Review from Alien Underground 0.0, London 1994
by Flint Michigan

Critical Art Ensemble:
The Electronic Disturbance
(Autonomedia, 1994)
A collection of 6 essays that take a look at the changing face of resistance in the now much hyped technological age with its electronic spaces that are creating social conditions that the CAE like to call liquescence. On a first flick this collection looks like one more revamping of the Deleuze and Guattari vocabulary with a nod to everyones best mates – the Situationist International. [Read more →]

“SITUATIONISM ON WHEELS: SKATEBORED IS NOT SKATEBOARD”

Corollary to “In Skatebored We Noize” by dj Balli (+ Bel.04)
balli
For decades now Situationism has been subsumed by the historification assembly line, emptied of any subversive potential. It is a corpse, an object of interest offrom Academy’s forensic scientists in search of pret-a-portér radicalisms. However, some of its “practical-theoretical” organs have been transplanted. For example, the alternative use of urban space performed in such an explicit way by psychogeographical dérives stands as a founding element of skateboarding.
[Read more →]

Guy Debord

by Anselm Jappe translated into English by Donald Nicholson-Smith with assistance from the author (University of California Press 1999)

The situationists declared somewhere that boredom was counter-revolutionary. They forgot to add that it is also wearisome and stupid. Jappe’s squib is both the most boring and by far and away the most stupid book to be written about a situationist to date – and in saying this I’m conscious of the fact that the competition consists largely of art monographs and the throughput of Andrew Murray Scott. Aside from the fact that it is printed on paper of some character – soft, off-white and pleasant to touch – about all that can be said in favour of Jappe’s handbook is that it is not a biography at all. The publishers puff Jappe’s guff as an intellectual biography – but a low-brow, one-sided and woefully inadequate introduction to situationism would be a more accurate description.
[Read more →]

TROCCHI – THE TRANSVERSALIST

A Life in Pieces: Reflections on Alexander Trocchi [Rebel inc.]
ed. Allan Campbell and Tim Niel

A follow through from the TV documentary of the same name, this volume collects together the various interviews that were gathered for research and presents them in their entirety together with fragments of Trocchi’s writing, odd letters, tape transcripts, essays and appreciations. The basic tenor of the questioning lies around Trocchi the writer and the reasons for his ‘silence’ after Cain’s Book; so like the TV programme there is much about wasted talent and drugs. As most of the interviewees have some kind of professional investment in writing it is hardly so surprising that they don’t too arduously pursue the reasons behind Trocchi’s criticisms of and dissatisfactions with writing. At the same time, though the interviewers˛ try to encourage people to talk about Project Sigma, the phrasing of their questions shows next-to-no identification with even the idealist component of Sigma. An image of rebellion as egotistical and radicalism as self-indulgent is what certain interviewees and contributors eagerly embrace and it is really only Bill Burroughs and Leonard Cohen who defend Trocchi’s communitarian hopes. It is Burroughs, who responding to the lead-in that Sigma was far-fetched, replies sympathetically: “I think that it is indeed far-fetched but he possibly had some idea there’s enough minds that would…. Different ideas would of course make a change in society and that’s not without foundation. It’s the way changes come about”. [Read more →]

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