Datacide Twelve – Introduction

 

 

The precursor to datacide is the magazine titled Alien Underground, which appeared with two issues in 1994/95. In the first issue of Alien Underground, there is a manifesto-like text signed “praxis nov. 1994” titled “Nothing Essential Happens in the Absence of Noise”. It describes “Techno” as a subversive agent that shook up cultural production, whether corporate or independent. “The industry then got the fear (…) because the principle of its organisation > the top to bottom one way transmission > got short circuited, & there was no transmitter or receiver, only a mixer & rooms full of people + noise. (…) a zone populated by savages seeking forbidden pleasures in a wasteland (…) uncontrollable and incomprehensible for teacher, cops, parents, the industry & media.” The backlash was not long to follow: “Formula were created & market research employed, documentaries were made, and laws drafted. It all needed to be brought back into the world of the spectacle, made safe for mass consumption; faces appeared, and like in a demonstration of power, talentless DJ’s were made superstars.” What we saw as raw and subversive was “streamlined for mass-brainwashing & pacification” in the form of “Nazi-Trance and Audio-Valium”. Still there was optimism: “But techno is always mutating, (…) always moving into different directions, & the time is now that transformations are under way that will lead to new places, eruptions, excess… In a situation where most of the supposedly underground parties are playing the same shit as everywhere else, where sponsorship deals + big money have moved in, a new resistance is emerging slowly>>>”.

This was also the moment when TechNET appeared. [Read more →]

From Conspiracy Theories to Attempted Assassinations: The American Radical Right and the Rise of the Tea Party Movement

Introduction

Contemporary American politics initially appears to have achieved unprecedented diversity in its representation of the present demographics of society: Barack Obama is the first African American U.S. president, while in the 111th Congress (Jan. 3, 2009-Jan. 3, 2011) Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) was the first female Speaker of the House of Representatives, and Barney Frank (D-MA) was the first openly gay chair of the House Financial Services Committee. However, Obama’s ascension to the presidency in January 2009 was a moment of extreme contradictions. On the one hand, liberals and the progressives, the so-called “left”, embraced the mainstream, centrist agenda of the Obama administration. Conversely, this was also period when far right hate groups and the armed “patriot” movement dramatically increased. With the rise of the Tea Party “Movement” (TPM) to national prominence, Obama and Pelosi have been made into caricatures representative of a variety of “evil” and conspiratorial elements in society by the right’s mainstream and radical media. However, the radical right’s fear of the loss of the white demographic majority in America that is fueling the TPM is not an actual reality in the 111th Congress, which is made up of 100 Senators and 435 House representatives. There were only 17 women, 1 African American, zero Hispanic Americans, and 3 Asian Americans in the Senate, while the House was made up of 73 women, 42 African Americans, 27 Hispanic Americans and 6 Asian Americans, despite the fact that US population is (approximately) more than 50% female, 15.8% Hispanic American, 12.4% African American, and 4.4% Asian American. The issue of representation is further called into question when addressing the economic disparities between Congress and the average US population. 261 members or half of Congress are millionaires, and 55 members are worth more than $10 million. In 2009, the median wealth of a House member was $765,010, while the median wealth for a senator was nearly $2.38 million.i [Read more →]

The “Radical Left” in the British General Elections

The British elections ended with the predictable result: Labour had significant losses, the Tories significant gains although not as many as they had expected. The LibDems on the other hand – who had thought they could cash in on a media-generated “Cleggstasy” failed to turn this phantom into reality. In the end they however managed to make a deal with the Tories and are now in a coalition government with them. [Read more →]

LOS LAZOS SOCIALES NO PUEDEN DINAMITARSE !

Spanish translation of
You Cannot Blow Up Social Relations
published in the zine accompanying Bogotrax Festival in Bogota, Colombia, Feb 11-21, 2010

Este es el texto de una charla presentada en Berlin el 12 de septiembre del 2009 en el Samacafé para el festival Bogotrax-Berlin. Fue parte de una tarde de discusión y documentación relativa a la situación en Colombia. El texto, traducido del ingles, lo reproducimos acá sin ninguna alteración y guardando algunos de los giros coloquiales relativos a una texto destinado como soporte de una conferencia. La mayoría de las citas fueron primero retraducidas del alemán por el autor y a su vez retraducidas por nosotros al castellano.

El Autor : Christoph Fringeli es desde 1997 el editor de Datacide, la revista subterránea sobre “ruido y política” (datacide-magazine.com, donde pueden encontrar la versión original del siguiente texto). Es también desde principios de los 90’s el motor de Praxis (praxis.c8.com) el primer sello de música electrónica radical, vanguardia de los ritmos rotos, del “breakcore” avant-la-lettre y del compromiso sónico con la revolución. Bogotrax lo vuelve a convocar como el singular ejemplo de uno de los más dicientes compromisos tácticos entre la teoría y la práctica.

LOS LAZOS SOCIALES NO PUEDEN DINAMITARSE !
You cannot blow up social relations !!!

Para una crítica real de la lucha armada
[Read more →]

“WR: Mysteries of the Organism” Screening 16/12

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WR: Mysteries of the Organism
(Directed by Dusan Makaveyev, 1971, English and Serbo-Croation with English Subtitles, 85 minutes)
16 December, 20 Uhr @ Cagliostro / Praxis Shop – Lenbachstr. 10 Ostkreuz, Berlin

Datacide presents the screening of “WR: Mysteries of the Organism” at Cagliostro on 16 December at 20,00. Originally titled “WR (Wilhelm Reich): Mysteries of the Orgasm”, this subversive critique was shown only at a few cinemas in Yugoslavia in 1971 and then banned. This forced the director to emigrate in order to continue his relentless critique of Marxist-Lennism, traditional sexual politics and all anti-liberatory tendencies of the Cold War era. “WR” masterfully uses collage filmic technique to interlace documentary, fictional and found footage together into a combative story on Reich’s sexual politics. The collage techniques shock the viewer and instigating critique at every level. Datacide (C. Fringeli and Nemeton) will make a short introduction and a discussion with the viewing audience at the end of the film to highlight some of the aesthetic and political issues.

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