Datacide Talk this Saturday May 12th at OKK, Berlin

Praxis and Datacide support the OKK and their Critical Reflections of Berlin Biennale 7 titled “2012 is the Season for Treason”. Taking place at Raum 29, Prinzenallee 29, Berlin-Wedding. Free entry.
Watch out for Datacide talk this saturday based on the article “From Subculture to Hegemony: Transversal Strategies of the New Right in Neofolk and Industrial”. More infos on the rest of the program:
http://www.kritische-kunst.org/
and here:
http://2012istheseasonfortreason.wordpress.com/

Most read Datacide articles in 2011

… And more charts: these were the 10 most read articles on this web site during 2011:

1. From Subculture to Hegemony: Transversal Strategies of the New Right in Neofolk and Martial Industrial by Christoph Fringeli

2. Shaking The Foundations: Reggae soundsystem meets ‘Big Ben British values’ downtown by John Eden

3. Tortugan tower blocks? Pirate signals from the margins by Alexis Wolton

4. We Mean It Man: Punk Rock and Anti-Racism – or, Death In June Not Mysterious by Stewart Home

5.COIL – Interview from 1986 plus Introduction by Christoph Fringeli/John Balance

6. Dance Before The Police Come by Neil Transpontine

7. What The Fuck – Operation Spanner by Jo Burzynska

8. The Brain of Ulrike Meinhof by Christoph Fringeli

9. Dope smuggling, LSD manufacture, organised crime & the law in 1960s London by Stewart Home

10. Battlenoise! Review by Christoph Fringeli

From Subculture to Hegemony: Transversal Strategies of the New Right in Neofolk and Martial Industrial

Neo-Folk and Martial Industrial are two sub-categories of Industrial Music, which developed in the 1980’s. Industrial as such was a direction that – parallel to Punk Rock – worked with the latest electronics in order to create an aesthetic of futuristic noise machines of the late 20th century and research extreme zones of contemporary society and history. Throbbing Gristle already thematized concentration camps, serial killers, Aleister Crowley etc by using cut-up techniques of William S. Burroughs and Brion Gysin and thus with strategies of liberation from brain washing. Similarly, Cabaret Voltaire were said to wage a “propaganda war against the propaganda war” (Industrial Culture Handbook). With SPK this was combined with a critique of Psychiatry and a presentation of extremes of the body and death. In the 80’s there were agitational and critical bands such as Test Dept., Nocturnal Emissions and Bourbonese Qualk which were often associated with the ever broadening spectrum of “Industrial”. However, with Laibach the critique of totalitarianism became more ambivalent. This ambivalence was at first seemingly shared by Death In June, the band that in many ways was at the origin of what is now considered Neo-Folk and Martial Industrial. [Read more →]

Battlenoise! – On the Ideology of “Martial Industrial” Music

Martial Industrial is a small sub-section in and development from industrial music. It is a particular form of industrial focused on a mythisized “heroic” past. As a scene it is related to the Neo-folk and neo-classical as well as the power-industrial scene, by itself it is relatively tiny.
In the summer of 2007 a book titled “Battlenoise! – The Blows of Martial Industrial” was published by the Polish label War Office Propaganda in conjunction with the Hungarian MozgaloM. It was a translation from the Hungarian, the author preferred to be referred to only as “PHJ”.
The book caused a bit of an uproar in the concerned circles and after Albin Julius of Der Blutharsch threatened to sue for copyright violation, the book was supposedly withdrawn from circulation.
[Read more →]

WE MEAN IT MAN: Punk Rock and Anti-Racism – or, Death In June not Mysterious

PUNK ROCK AND ANTI-RACISM – or,
DEATH IN JUNE NOT MYSTERIOUS

death-in-june

The hoary debate about punk rock and politics was recently given a boost by the publication of Punk Rock: So What? edited by Roger Sabin. (1) The editor’s essay ‘I Won’t Let That Dago By: Rethinking Punk and Racism’ is one of several pieces that raises the issue of punk politics directly. Claiming that there is a consensus about British punk rock of the seventies being ‘essentially solid with the anti-racist cause’, Sabin sees a punk alliance with the organisations Rock Against Racism (RAR) and the Anti-Nazi League (ANL) as providing the capstone of this myth. Sabin deflates what he sees as the fable of punk anti-racism by trotting out a few examples of unsavoury lyrics and media sound bites.
[Read more →]

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