These Laws: Up Yours! – Documents Relating to “Revolt of the Ravers”

Here we compile small number of documents – press clippings and flyers – relating to the article Revolt of the Ravers – The Movement against the Criminal Justice Act in Britain 1993-95 from Datacide 13. Do you have documents relating to the events? If so please contact us at datacide (at) c8.com

PointLawscopy

Tabloid paper for the ravers – or self-declared “Point of Sanity in the World of Bullshit” THE POINT with a anti-CJA headline (undated)

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Spannered – Bert Random interviewed by Neil Transpontine

‘Spannered’ is a fictionalised account of the free party scene, spanning a lost weekend in the mid-1990s. In this conversation with Neil Transpontine, the novel’s author Bert Random reflects on free parties then and now, the famous Bristol scene and much more. The book is available from http://www.spanneredbooks.com/

1. Spannered reads very much like an insider’s account of the 1990s free party scene – written by somebody who was intimately involved in it, rather than by a writer who stumbled into a party in search of material for a novel. Can you say a bit about your involvement at the time and the squat party scene in Bristol (maybe mention some of the sound systems, places where parties happened etc.).

There had always been squat parties and random dances in Bristol, ever since I was a teenager. Like loads of Bristol kids of my age, I was first drawn into skateboarding when I was 13 or 14, which led to punk and graffiti and hip-hop, and then into dance music and raving. There were things happening everywhere: in squats where my mates were living, in places like the Pink Palace (which was a four-story building right in the middle of town that was filled with skate-ramps and painted with huge pink balloons on the outside), in the basements and back-rooms of dodgy pubs, and in weird, derelict, places tucked around the edges of Bristol’s inner-city. [Read more →]

Pics from Datacide Release Event

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Datacide 11 talk by DJ Balli moved to Friday

The first night of datacide events happened on Thursday February 3 with Neil Transpontine’s talk “Dance Before The Police Come” and – since DJ Balli was stuck in Rome and couldn’t catch his plane – Nemeton’s talk about the American radical right and the rise of the tea party movement, plus discussion with Neil, Nemeton, Kovert, CF and the audience about topics in the new issue. Balli has safely arrived and his talk will be at 5pm at Cagliostro Lenbachstr. 10 10245 Berlin Friday! – before the launch party at subversiv.

Countdown to Datacide Eleven

We are currently adding the last finishing touches to the new print edition of datacide!
And we are preparing 2 events to launch Datacide 11: an evening of talks and a party:

Thursday, 3. February 2011 – TALKS & DISCUSSION

Cagliostro, Lenbachstr. 10, (Ostkreuz), from 17h

“333 bpm” – a sonic-fiction by Riccardo Balli
Iconographic references by: Caina
Every style in electronic music inspires a certain social behaviour, well more, it actually structures the listener’s brainframe. Do you want to know how? And, above all, do you want to smash this social brainframe down by hyper-mixing genres? Some tips on how to do this can maybe come from this fiction, a sonic one, of course!

Dance before the police come – talk by Neil Transpontine
What’s going on when police raid parties? Neil Transpontine explores the different ways laws on sex, drugs, noise, property and subversion are used to constrain dancing in the UK and across the world.

Friday, 4. February 2011 – PARTY

datacide11releaseweb

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