ROMA RIOT

A little bit of splendour and inauspicious history.

“People asked me questions about tomatos robbing the vine and rotting on the vine and I had no idea what I was thinking about and abided in blank ecstasy”.
“The only cure for morphine poisoning is more morphine”.
[Jack Kerouac – Mexico City Blues 1959]

roma-riot
The ROMAN context doesn’t breathe quite well. It’s blocked up by the habit of a routine which offers almost the same, approximate, superficial stuff.
In spite of the indefatigable activity of a small part, we have to notice that Rome lived other periods, even short, distinguished by a deep, rebel, stired up spirit. In those periods all the people involved did the best to lead their attitudes and behaviours, honestly inclined to the transformation and the global mutation of everything around our existence and “resistance”.
The social control in its most marked issues (see the fortunately faulted attempts of police to stop the raves) has been able to refrain the intentions of many, but at the same time made harsher the intentions of the few, as us, which never gave up the fight to claim actions, facts and events filled with emancipation and freedom.
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Wreckers of Civilisation: The Story of COUM Transmissions & Throbbing Gristle by Simon Ford (Book Review)

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The Story of COUM Transmissions & Throbbing Gristle by Simon Ford
(Black Dog Publishing, London 1999, £19.95)

By focusing on a performance art troop that metamorphosed into a rock group, Simon Ford has produced a book that illuminates the political economy of UK cultural production during the 1970’s. This was a time when there was cheap housing plus plentiful arts grants and welfare benefits. Perfect conditions in which cultural experimentation could flourish as well as a lot of art wank that was pushed by those responsible as cutting edge work. Far more than the other members of COUM and TG, motor mouthed front man Genesis P.Orridge exemplifies the commendable excesses of this era. WHile P.Orridge’s collaborators had day jobs and identifiable talents, Genesis lived out his fantasies of bohemian dissolution as a life-style option and non-stop fashion statement. This entailed the proto-slacker presenting himself as a starving artist in order to get grants, as well as making judicious use of that alternative arts funding scheme known as the dole.
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Wreck‘n’Roll

Further into the Mission of the HWF…

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EIght months have passed since the formation of the Homewrecker Foundation and with them came an onslaught of other “all-female” labels and movements. Seems to me that this was the perfect time to wreck the shit in the otherwise male dominated domain…especially since we are still the only real ones doing it.
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Chrome

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San Francisco mid-seventies, a dark shadow is hanging over Height Ashbury, hippie burnouts populating the streets – Deadheads, locked in a new nostalgia in the face of the grim reality of 70’s re-consolidation. LSD still pumping in the bloodstream, having been consumed in absurd quantities in the previous decade, but Tim Leary had turned snitch for the state prosecution and had not reinvented himself yet as cyberspace guru and Marlboro rights campaigner as he would in the even grimmer 80’s.
The Weather Underground, who had understood that the solution to Vietnam was not to just stop the war, but to bring the war back home, had been beaten.
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Al Sayhah

“A book is made up of signs that speak of other signs”
Umberto Eco

“Disinformation” records clearly aspire, like Dr Who’s Tardis, to be bigger on the inside than they are on the outside, loaded with hints, clues and allusions designed to tempt listeners to investigate interesting ideas. The “Al-Jabr” CD (Ash International, Ash 4.3), Disinformation’s latest exercise in weapons-grade electronica, is no certainly exception. Its predecessor “Antiphony” presented the remix process as a parody of the techniques of traditional church music, while Al-Jabr takes its central analogy from an underground publication circulating in medieval Europe. The ninth century astronomer, geographer and mathematician Abu Ja’far Muhammad ibn Musa / Al-Khwarizmi’s book “Ilm Al-Jabr W’almukábalah” – literally the “reunification of broken bones” – introduced European accountants to both ‘Arabic’ (Sanskrit) numerals and to the system of symbolic mathematical reduction whose name corrupts into English from its Arabic form: equations as fractures, solutions as surgery, remixes as reunifications.
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