Anti-Semitism from Beyond the Grave – Muslimgauze’s Jihad

Bryn Jones started making music in the early 80’s under the name E.g Oblique Graph. In 1983 he changed the name of the project to Muslimgauze in response to the Israeli invasion of Lebanon. Since then he has been producing an abundance of material with an ever increasing frequency of releases, a situation that hasn’t changed with his death in January 1999. On the contrary, there has been a plethora of re-releases and dozens of CD’s of previously unreleased material.
Muslimgauze’s music can be described as usually monotonous “ethnic” percussion, interspersed with Middle Eastern sounds and atmospherics, with some excursions into ambient or slightly more dance-floor oriented material. This is however only half of what there is to Muslimgauze: The other prime aspect is the political impetus behind the music, without which, as Jones never tired to continually emphasize, there would be no music. This inspiration is provided by the adulation of Arab political and religious leaders such as Arafat, Khomeini, Gaddafi, Saddam, Abu Nidal etc. as well as organizations such as the PLO, Hamas and Hizbollah. In short, everybody and everything that is waging war against Israel in the region. The records are a platform to propagate this war, and so are his appearances in the media. [Read more →]

COIL – Interview from 1986 plus Introduction

“Jhonn Balance (aka John Balance and Geff Rushton) died at home on November 13 in a fall, leaving the music world and the wider world of magick without one of its most gifted and vivid voices.”

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The news was shocking to many people interested in “industrial” and “experimental” music. Personally I was surprised at John Balance’s (as I knew him) relatively young age – 42. Not because it is such an unusual fact dying from an accident at that age – for accidents any age will do. But my mind would zoom back to late 1986 when I was exchanging letters with him for the purpose of an interview I was conducting for a zine I was doing at the time. This was a time before the internet and emails – it was hand-written pages that were sent back and forth. I was 20 then but a large gap seemingly separated me from the somewhat admired 24 year old.
I had come to music relatively late and had entered a rapid development in my late teens. The Coil album “Scatology” was a very special discovery for me: With a black and white cover filled with text and literary references it caught my attention by chance in a local record store, and when I listened to it I was blown away. Co-produced by Clint Ruin a.k.a. Jim Foetus, the sound is still astonishing now, a tough to-the-point production. This was a debut album by a then new formation, but of course the story didn’t start there. [Read more →]

LOTTA CONTINUA:

ROOTS MUSIC AND THE POLITICS OF PRODUCTION

“A gigantic cultural revolution is underway. Free expression and the joy of bodies, the autonomy, hybridisation and the reconstruction of languages, the creation of new singular and mobile modes of production – all this emerges, everywhere and continually.”
Toni Negri

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There are threads running through the 1978 film Rockers that encapsulate the musical production process. From the opening scene of impromtu drummers and the horn rehearsal in the yard, followed by the studio session and manufacture of the single at the pressing plant, through to the distribution of records by motorbike and their reception at the counter of disco- shops and sound-systems the whole process of production, inclusive of the social practice from which it springs, is highlighted. But, crucially, each moment of this process is presented as a site of conflict. There is the musician as wage labourer having to ask to be paid and then being paid in records, there is the alternative distribution method of the motorbike and there is the policeraid on the sound-system. [Read more →]

Praxis + Break/Flow

‘Communist’ Seven Inch
Product Blueprint

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Side A Cornelius Cardew: Smash Smash The Social Contract
Side B Royal Family & The Poor: Vaneigem Mix

(Could have cut-up readings from Marx (see over) as small tracks on either side to be recorded as layers with different amounts of echo and with Eastenders on in the background and including repeating turntable samples of Scritti Politti’s politico-pop hit ‘Wood Beez’ – particularly the lines “Oh lets forget our ownership” and “There’s nothing I wouldn’t do not to meet with your approval” as puncturation between quotes?)

Cover : Bright Red
[Read more →]

WE MEAN IT MAN: Punk Rock and Anti-Racism – or, Death In June not Mysterious

PUNK ROCK AND ANTI-RACISM – or,
DEATH IN JUNE NOT MYSTERIOUS

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The hoary debate about punk rock and politics was recently given a boost by the publication of Punk Rock: So What? edited by Roger Sabin. (1) The editor’s essay ‘I Won’t Let That Dago By: Rethinking Punk and Racism’ is one of several pieces that raises the issue of punk politics directly. Claiming that there is a consensus about British punk rock of the seventies being ‘essentially solid with the anti-racist cause’, Sabin sees a punk alliance with the organisations Rock Against Racism (RAR) and the Anti-Nazi League (ANL) as providing the capstone of this myth. Sabin deflates what he sees as the fable of punk anti-racism by trotting out a few examples of unsavoury lyrics and media sound bites. [Read more →]

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