News

Study on “a-typical” Anti-psychotic Drugs Shows Risks

September 23rd, 2008

In issue number 8 of datacide we published an article on “Psychiatry – Social Hygiene and Mind Control”.
One topic was the widespread prescription of neuroleptic drugs, and a central claim was that the rampant use of “a-typical” neuroleptics (such as Zyprexa, Risperdal and Seroquel) was barely a progress compared to the old “typical” neuroleptics such as Haldol or Clopixol, except for the fact that these have less obvious adverse effects in the region of motoric disturbances.
A major new study is now confirming this.
Although this is hardly news, it seems to be only slowly seeping into the mainstream, all the while the pharmaceutical companies marketing such drugs are making massive profits.
Ely Lilly, the manufacturer of Zyprexa was selling this medication to the tune of $4 billion in one year alone.
While it is to be welcomed that knowledge about the dangers of these drugs is becoming more wide-spread, unfortunately it isn’t going hand in hand with a more critical approach to the ideology that leads to the rampant over-use of mind-dimming medication. As evident from the N.Y. TImes piece, some doctors merely go back to old school “typical” neuroleptics to avoid the adverse effect of a-typicals, knowingly exposing patients to the risks of Tardive Dyskenesia and other debilitating adverse effects.

Not only are these medications prescribed for all kinds of ailments they were never supposed to treat, they are also being increasingly prescribed to children.
What ultimately needs to be challenged is the diagnosis of schizophrenia itself on the one hand, schizophrenia being – rather than a recognizable illness – more like a collection of symptoms.
On the other hand, and going with it, it has to be recognized that the widespread use of neuroleptics and other psychiatric drugs is putting the brains of millions in chemical straitjackets, in what amounts to social control on a huge scale.

some further infos:
http://breggin.com (site of the consistent critic of biologist psychiatry, Peter Breggin)
http://www.zyprexaclassaction.com/ (now defunct, but still contains interesting information)
http://www.monheit.com/risperdal/news.asp (another legal case site, with up to date links)

Bifo in Osaka

July 15th, 2008

Franco Berardi, better known as the Italian media theorist Bifo, was in Osaka, Japan last week as part of a tour that brought him to the protests against the G8 meeting in Hokkaido. He gave a talk on media activism at an event organized by Remo, a local media collective, where he discussed not only his own activity in Italy but posed some critical questions to the audience about the situation in Japan.
He began by playing a short documentary on Telestreet, a pirate television project organized around Italy that seeks to create self-media and challenge the existing media monopoly held by [Read more →]

Sub/Version 013 – Vile Enginez: Cycadelic / Tool out now!

July 13th, 2008

After several months on white label Vile Enginez’ new release on Sub/Version is out this week – a mind trip through devilish labyrinths of a myriad of sound constructions. Vile Enginez, hailing for Basel, CH, has produced his most innovative and complex record yet – and look for his next Zhark Intl. release sometime in the future. Taking up the Sub/version project of twisting drum n bass and smashing up whatever has become standard for the genre, Vile Enginez bizarre creation clearly demonstrates his masterful production and technical skills. “Cycadelic” might be best described as creating the feeling of a black magic trip spurned on by female power gone mad – this is a track that will push everyone on the dance floor to extremes. “Tool” works perfectly with the dynamic of “Cycadelic” making a forceful totality of this 12” (played at 33 rpm). Hard-hitting beats, crazed ambiences, distorted full powered bass and rhythmic complexities abound !

Available now from

http://praxis.c8.com/catalog

Repression and the Riot Situation in Kamagasaki (Osaka) related to G8 Meeting

June 18th, 2008

Over the past week and a half, an unprecedented political crackdown has been enacted in advance of a series of economic summits around the country. Despite this, the brave workers of Kamagasaki stood up against the stiff security environment in riots against the brutal beating of a day laborer over the past five days. The twin situations of repression and revolt deserve to be examined in more detail.
[Read more →]

Objection to Procedure Interview with Christoph Fringeli (2000)

June 17th, 2008

Objection to Procedure Interview with Christoph Fringeli (2000)

1. Your contribution to the harsher elements of hardcore are most easily
chronicled in the progress and history of the Praxis label. Please describe
what you saw Praxis’ purpose when it began in 1992, and what you see its
purpose as now.

I had been involved with what you might call industrialnoisejazzpunknowave shit in the mid- to late 80’s, and ran a label called Vision in Basel, Switzerland, where I grew up. Around 1990 I became extremely disillusioned with the “independent” scene, as it seemed to be replicating the mechanisms and values of the major music market. This is a process that hasn’t stopped since: it’s all about commodification of young people’s creative energies, and channeling them into something that is cementing the current dominant social-relations by creating the idiotic concept of “great artists” = “stars”, and divisions between audience and performers.
When the first wave of Acid House hit (say ’87) I was quite intrigued by the DIY aesthetic and the concept of anonymous white labels, but with the exception of a small handful of tracks, such as Phuture’s Trax releases which I thought were brilliant, really fucking weird, overall there were not that many interesting tracks to support a whole new concept of use value of records, which I think really happened around ’90/91. Suddenly there were all these 12″s coming out that had a much harder sound, and I think for me personally seeing Underground Resistance in the Tresor club in Berlin was a real turning point, but it was backed up and supported by countless often anonymous producers churning out banging tracks all over the world.
By the end of 1991 I was squatting in South London and the following year the first couple of Praxis records appeared. I’d rather not try and “chronicle” Praxis here, as it had and continues to have an intense history, but to try and stay clear and short, one of the basic departure points were that I wanted to take elements of the new dance culture and push them a bit further, distort them, make them more extreme.
I was, and I’m still, particularly interested in the aspect of collective cultural creation and experience. The “artist” would no longer so much express their personal feelings towards the world and expecting to be admired for it like in rock music, but take elements others were working on and add their touch, throw it back into a collective pool; and the actual experience of the music would not so much take place in the bedroom, but at a party where a DJ would use records as raw material for his set.
Of course the existing system of record labels, distributors and media has done everything to appropriate these tendencies and recuperate them for their economy; of course the revolution has not been successful in the sense that the old concepts have been destroyed, with a lot of help by the media they survived in people’s heads. Of course there were soon DJ stars etc, but at the same time there exists a resistance network that simply produces the better, more exciting music, and it’s self-organized, autonomous and based around sound systems and small labels.
Praxis exists in this context of feedback loops between producers, sound systems, underground distribution, always trying to add a new twist to the dialectics of liberation.
[Read more →]

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