Articles

Praxis Documentary ‘Nothing Essential Happens in the Absence of Noise’ showing at Globale Filmfestival 29-01-2016

Silvia Biagioni’s documentary on Praxis will be shown this Friday as a part of the Program of the Globale Film Festival. The Festival is taking place at Kino Movimento from Thursday 28th to Sunday 31st, “Nothing Essential Happens in the Absence of Noise” will be screened Friday night at 21.30. Both Silvia as well as Christoph Fringeli will be there for questions/discussion.

FESTIVAL PAGE FOR THE MOVIE

Most Read Datacide Articles in 2015

As always in the first days of the new year we publish a list of the most read articles on datacide (online) during the previous year:

1. You’re Too Young to Remember the Eighties – Dancing in a Different Time by DJ Controlled Weirdness. This nice piece on the 80′s dance underground in London is from Datacide Ten, published in 2008 and already the most read article for the last two years! And since last year it also has become the most read piece on this site, overtaking the Coil Interview from 1986, which was still the second most read piece in 2015:

2. COIL – Interview from 1986 plus Introduction. Classic interview with John Balance – originally published in the Zine “turn to crime” (Vision 2). Vision was of course the predecessor of Praxis/Datacide. Reprinted in Datacide Nine (2006/2014)

3. Anti-Semitism from Beyond the Grave – Muslimgauze’s Jihad by Christoph Fringeli. Getting read more and more – and predictably STILL getting the usual flak from fanboys and apologists… Originally from Datacide Nine (2006)

4. Dope Smuggling, LSD Manufacture, Organised Crime & the Law in 1960s London by Stewart Home from Datacide Eleven, based on his talk at the 2008 datacide conference in Berlin, and in each top 10 since then… Originally published in Datacide Eleven (2011).

5. From Subculture to Hegemony: Transversal Strategies of the New Right in Neofolk and Martial Industrial by Christoph Fringeli from Datacide Eleven (2011). This was the most read article in 2011, number 5 in 2012, number 3 in 2013 and 5 in 2014 as well as this year.

6. What the Fuck? – Operation Spanner by Jo Burzynska – always in this chart since 2011, this is the oldest Datacide article here – from Datacide Two, 1997.

7. The Brain of Ulrike Meinhof by CF is another text with a a steady readership, both previous years at number 8, in 2014 it dropped out of the “top 10” only to re-appear again this year. Originally from Datacide Nine.

8. For the first time in this list is a short article about the text “Der Waldgang” by the writer Ernst Jünger, originally published as an appendix to “From Subculture to Hegemony” (see number 5 in this list).

9. When I landed at Gatwick Airport a couple of months ago the HSBC advertising campaign which served as the launching pad for this article by Split Horizon was still running (as it probably was elsewhere). The question remains: What is this future?. From Datacide Twelve, 2012.

10. The most read article from Datacide Fourteen in 2015 is John Eden’s account of the Hackney police’s “community relations”: “They Hate Us, We Hate Them” – Resisting Police Corruption and Violence in Hackney in the 1980s and 1990s.

11. Walter Marchetti was the subject of an essay by Howard Slater written in 2000 titled All Was Music (published in Datacide Eight in 2002). Many people read it following Marchetti’s death in May 2015.

12. Spiral Tribe interview with Mark Harrison from issue Thirteen by Neil Transpontine. Essential for those interested in the history of the 23 tribe and free party culture!

13. “Long Live Death!” – On Pasolini’s Salò, one of Howard Slater’s excellent writing on film (from Datacide Eight, 2002)

14. DJ Controlled Weirdness on the old New York and its nightlife before gentrification took hold (Datacide Fourteen, 2014): Journeys in the Naked City – Adventures in New York Before the Rain, a great sequel to his You’re Too Young to Remember the Eighties.

15. Shaking The Foundations: Reggae soundsystem meets ‘Big Ben British values’ downtown – one of the articles that appeared in Datacide (this one in issue Eleven, 2011) dealing with the reggae soundsystem culture and its history, by John Eden.

16. Also by John Eden is this interview: The Dog’s Bollocks – Vagina Dentata Organ and The Valls Brothers which gives great insight into some of the more interesting industrial culture.

17. Dancing with Death: The Excremental, the Sacred & Ecstatic Community in Free Party Culture by Hannah Lammin

18. Revolt of the Ravers – The Movement against the Criminal Justice Act in Britain 1993-95 by Neil Transponine.

19. This online-only article Repression and the Riot Situation in Kamagasaki (Osaka) related to G8 Meeting by JR from 2008 had a steep surge of readership in spring 2014 and was still read often enough in the following year to make it into this “top 20”.

20. François Genoud – The life of a Swiss banker and fascist anti-Imperialist by CF, originally published in Datacide Ten.

Rather than making it a “top ten” as in previous years, we decided to enlarge it to include the 20 most read pieces. After all we don’t necessarily want people to keep reading the same articles, as interesting as they are, but hopefully discover new ones as well. For this reason we add three more (more or less randomly chosen) articles which for some reason haven’t nearly received the attention they deserve.

-3: Book review of Die Revolution war für mich ein grosses Abenteuer – Paul Mattick im Gespräch mit Michael Buckmiller by CF from Datacide Fourteen. Revolution & Left Communism!

-2: Submission Soundtracking by Robert Old – Electronica, X-Files, Information War… Auto-Toxicity! …from Datacide Eight.

-1: Howard Slater on The Western, more writing on film from Datacide Four (1998)!

Enjoy!

Launch Events for datacide_books in London this Weekend!

We are doing a launch event for our two new books at Housmans Bookshop this Friday and will have a stall at the London Anarchist Bookfair this Saturday!

Hope to see you there!

Details:

Friday, 23-10-2015, from 7.30pm (until ca. 9pm) at Housmans Bookshop, 5 Caledonian Road, King’s Cross, London N1 9DX
Entry is £ 3.00 Redeemable towards any purchase in the store.
With speakers Stewart Home, Neil Transpontine and Christoph Fringeli
Please spread the word and invite your friends!
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Saturday 24-10-2015 from 10am-7pm Anarchist Bookfair
This year it’s at: Central Saint Martin’s, University of the Arts London, Granary Building, 1 Granary Square, London N1C 4AA
closest tube/train station King’s Cross/St.Pancras.
http://anarchistbookfair.org.uk/
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Archaeology of the Radical Internet: Reflections on the Early European Counter Network in the Age of ‘Networked Social Movements’

 

ecn1The euphoria of Occupy and the ‘Arab Spring’ seems a long way away. The mass movements on the streets and in the squares from 2010 to 2013 seemed to many to open up new forms of collective politics amidst a new global geography of public spaces – Tahrir Square (Cairo), Gezi Park (Istanbul), Zuccotti Park (New York), Puerta del Sol Square (Madrid), Syntagma square (Athens)…and many more. In his overview Why It’s Kicking Off Everywhere: The New Global Revolutions (2012), Paul Mason wrote that ‘There is a great river of human hope flowing’.
Manuel Castells – who I heard speaking at Occupy London to an audience seated on the steps of St Pauls Cathedral – also saw new hope in the emergence of non-hierarchical, non-programmatic ‘networked social movements’, facilitated and indeed transformed by new social media technologies, with ‘mass self-communication, based on horizontal networks of interactive, multidirectional communication on the internet and, even more so, in wireless communication networks’. Indeed, Castells argued, ‘the internet provides the organisational communication platform to transform the culture of freedom into the practice of autonomy’ (‘Network of Outrage and hope: social movements in the internet age’, 2012).

But right now, towards the end of 2014, it is increasingly difficult to sustain this optimism. [Read more →]

Dancing with Death: The Excremental, the Sacred & Ecstatic Community in Free Party Culture

death dance 2_72

Image by Darkam

‘The slaughterhouse is linked to religion in so far as the temples of bygone eras … served two purposes: they were used both for prayer and for killing. The result … was certainly a disturbing convergence of the mysteries of myth and the ominous grandeur typical of those places in which blood flows. … In our time, the slaughterhouse is cursed and quarantined like a plague-ridden ship. Now, the victims of this curse are neither butchers nor beasts, but those same good folk who countenance, … only their own unseemliness, an unseemliness commensurate with an unhealthy need of cleanliness, with irascible meanness, and boredom.’
Georges Bataille (1)

In 1999, in the shadow of the approaching millennium, a disused abattoir on Waterden Road in Hackney Wick was squatted and used over an extended period as a venue for free parties. The adjacent property was a large warehouse, which had been converted to an Evangelist Church. The area, which has now been demolished to make way for the London 2012 Olympic development, was a crumbling industrial wasteland contained by motorways, railways and waterways; there was little through traffic. Waterden road was made up of various warehouses, a nightclub, a bus depot, and a site which had been home to a community of travellers for over thirty years. Next to the Church stood the former Hackney Wick dog/speedway stadium, falling into dereliction. Every Sunday, the stadium car park came alive as an ad hoc market, where people came to trade all manner of goods, many rumoured to be of dubiously legal origins. The area had a liminal feel, as if thrown together, with premises that were in decline being put to unexpected uses. Hackney psychogeographer Iain Sinclair describes this lost street as ‘the very essence of edgelands’ (2).

This juxtaposition of church and abattoir falls short of the convergence of prayer and killing that Bataille identifies in archaic temples. But together these accidental neighbours form a disjointed figure through which to explore relations to death in contemporary society. I visit this landscape to set the scene for a short detour through and beyond Bataille’s thinking on ecstasy and the sacred in order to approach another matter: the experience of community. I argue that those free parties created an environment in which the experience of being-with-others had a particular intensity which can be understood as religious, but that this religiosity differs from that of the church. As I explore the edgelands, I will show that to think community is to inhabit a space of limits: the limits of the subject, of representation, and of the city. As such, the spatiality of social relations is connected to architecture. [Read more →]

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