Entries from October 2013

Pics from Datacide Launch in Berlin, Pt. 2 (Party)

Some pictures of the party taking place at the Datacide Thirteen launch event in Berlin on October 12, 2013 – if anyone has more pics, let us know! We will be uploading audio of the talks as well as video snippets of both talks and live acts/dj’s in the next days.

Yann Keller played an intense set…

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Pics from Datacide Launch in Berlin, Pt. 1 (Talks)

Some pictures of the talks taking place at the Datacide Thirteen launch event in Berlin on October 12, 2013 

After a few introductory words from CF….

Jason Skeet talked about “…the Constructivist Moment…”

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Datacide 13 Introduction

Introduction to the new print edition of Datacide – now available for EUR 5.00 including postage to anywhere in the world. Please send via paypal to datacide (at) c8.com, or order via the Praxis online store. Subscriptions cost EUR 12.00 for 3 issues. Still available are issues 10-12. These can be included in a subscription. A re-print of issue 9 will be published in November, and other print projects are in the works (see more details below).

In the next week or so we will publish audio and video from the two Datacide 13 launch events in Berlin and London. After that we’ll gradually make the content of Datacide 13 available on this site.

This issue of Datacide is released on 12 October 2013, one year after the publication of Datacide 12. Our new strategy is to publish Datacide yearly. That gives the editors and writers time to focus on new publication projects directly connected to the critiques and interventionist counter-cultural strategies articulated in Datacide. [Read more →]

Class Wargames – Full Movie

and the “extended Film Script” by Richard Barbrook and Fabian Tompsett is now available from the Praxis Shop!

Datacide 12 Introduction

The precursor to datacide is the magazine titled Alien Underground, which appeared with two issues in 1994/95. In the first issue of Alien Underground, there is a manifesto-like text signed “praxis nov. 1994” titled “Nothing Essential Happens in the Absence of Noise”. It describes “Techno” as a subversive agent that shook up cultural production, whether corporate or independent. “The industry then got the fear (…) because the principle of its organisation > the top to bottom one way transmission > got short circuited, & there was no transmitter or receiver, only a mixer & rooms full of people + noise. (…) a zone populated by savages seeking forbidden pleasures in a wasteland (…) uncontrollable and incomprehensible for teacher, cops, parents, the industry & media.” The backlash was not long to follow: “Formula were created & market research employed, documentaries were made, and laws drafted. It all needed to be brought back into the world of the spectacle, made safe for mass consumption; faces appeared, and like in a demonstration of power, talentless DJ’s were made superstars.” What we saw as raw and subversive was “streamlined for mass-brainwashing & pacification” in the form of “Nazi-Trance and Audio-Valium”. Still there was optimism: “But techno is always mutating, (…) always moving into different directions, & the time is now that transformations are under way that will lead to new places, eruptions, excess… In a situation where most of the supposedly underground parties are playing the same shit as everywhere else, where sponsorship deals + big money have moved in, a new resistance is emerging slowly>>>”.

This was also the moment when TechNET appeared. [Read more →]

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