Entries from April 2011

Digital Disease

Story by Dan Hekate

The smell of shit permeates the small murky room; the figure takes an age to pull himself out of the chair. A tangled mess of cables stretches out from his body to a bank of machines that hum ominously in the background. The drip that feeds his arm wobbles dangerously back and forth on its spindly metal legs before a withered hand stretches out to stabilise it. From distance it would be easy to mistake the character for an old frail man, closer inspection reveals he is just a 12 year old. The boy finally makes it to the small camera that sits but a few meters away. With some effort he turns on the record button and slumps back down into his chair. He takes a moment to compose himself, rolling his tongue around in his mouth to build up enough saliva to talk. [Read more →]

INFRA NOIR – 23 Untitled Poems

Untitled

The trauma recedes
into an equipping learnedness.
Not to yield to.
Not to wield.
Its partner will come
in a devastating minim.

8/3/2010
[Read more →]

Beat Blasted Planet an interview with Steve Goodman on “Sonic Warfare”

Steve Goodman is author of “Sonic Warfare, sound, affect and the ecology of fear”, a book just published by MIT Press. Tracing the politics of sound in ways that develop some of the arguments made in certain branches of Industrial Music and in the darker waves of Techno and Jungle, Sonic Warfare proposes a vivid and demanding cosmology of sound in the present day, written in a style that mixes reflections on music, philosophy, technology, dance, media, politics in a way that is both speculative and in the thick of it.
Aside from writing Steve produces and DJs under the name Kode9 and runs the Hyperdub label [Read more →]

Dance before the Police come

Shut Up and Dance’s 1991 hardcore LP ‘Dance Before the Police Come’ was released at a time when the UK authorities were struggling to contain the massive explosion of raves. Thousands of people each weekend were playing a cat and mouse game with the police to party in fields and warehouses, and if the state was often outwitted by meeting points in motorway service stations and convoys of cars, it tried to keep the lid on the phenomenon by staging high  profile raids. In 1990, for instance, an incredible 836 people were arrested at a Love Decade party in Gildersome near Leeds in the north of England.

Since then the global spread of Electronic Dance Music has generally been  accompanied by the flashing blue light, the siren, and that moment when the music is abruptly turned off and the order given to clear the building. Indeed, let’s face it, the frisson of illegality has sometimes added a pleasurable edge to partying – the thrill of overcoming official obstacles just to get there, of getting one over on the authorities. And even the most mainstream of commercial club promoters like to pose as underground outlaws because they once got told to turn the music down by a man in uniform.

But police raids are serious business – often involving arrests which can lead to imprisonment, people losing their livelihoods and, in some parts of the world, social ostracism. People get injured, beaten and sometimes even killed. This article looks at a sample of police raids in recent times to get a sense of the current state of play between cops and dancers in different parts of the world. [Read more →]